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is falling. any connection between these rocks heading toward us? >> well, nasa says no. the asteroid that we saw just whizzed by earth yesterday. they were coming in completely different directions. because of that, they're just random events that happened to occur at the same time. a really big coincidence. >> were you surprised to hear about the russian meteor? how rare is that? >> the russian meteor was a complete surprise to astronomers and, obviously, the public. it's fairly rare once every 100 years do you have this kind of event. the last one we saw in 1908, and that was a pretty devastating one, as well. but to have it occur over a populated area, documented with these youtube videos and whatnot, it's a very clear example of the power these space rocks can punch. >> yeah, it looked like a scene from a movie really more than anything. i can't imagine the fear being there. how would you describe this meteor? was it relatively small considering? >> yeah, you know, for what it was, it was a fairly small meteor. about 50 feet across, maybe a bus or an suv, a couple of suvs together. the o
to watch these things. and nasa has a near-earth program. it is, i would argue, it is underfunded because of what's at stake here both in the sense of preparedness and dealing with injury and upset. but as to deal with international incidents that might occur. you mentioned the 2002 meteorite over the mediterranean, at the time, the deputy director said if this would have happened over the subcontinent it might have been mistaken for a nuclear explosion in this belligerent stand off between india and pakistan at the time. there are certainly occasions back in the soviet days when the united states and russia mistook natural occurrences for what might have been belligerent events. and so, you have to watch these things. and the nasa near-earth program is important for all of those reasons. as you pointed out, as your other guest pointed out, the energy that's contained in just say small rock, you know, a foot across or a couple of feet across, traveling at these velocities can pack a lot of energy. so when it explodes, it's as if a nuclear explosion went off. obviously, not the radiation a
apparently unfounded. nasa is using radar and other technology to study how the asteroid behaves, including its rotation rate, its composition and how it's impacted by the earth's gravity. the idea is to learn enough to prevent cat as it sfroe fee from it threatening in the future. >> we're going to get a lot of information about the asteroid. we're interested in its future motion, whether or not it could come back, whether it threatens the earth. >> reporter: the odds are either this one or another will be back. an asteroid impact the earth about every 120 years on average. it will be visible in the rthernemisphere this evening if you have access to a telescope. for now it's on its way away from the earth out into outer space harmlessly rotating -- or resolving -- excuse me. harmlessly rotating -- i can't even think of the right word. orbiting the sun. harmlessly at least for now, jim. >> casey, thanks very much. we appreciate it. ? or gal lat particular news, a meteor lit up the skies over eastern russia. the blinding light was followed by a series of deafening explosions. listen to this.
't happen, nasa assures us, is this asteroid and, oh, yes, it has a name, called da 14, they say it will not hit earth. still, you cannot ignore the buzz around this out of this world event. so we have this whole team of reporters for you and analysts to bring you this historic moment. we have a so-called asteroid hunter, former astronaut, coming on live this hour and next to talk about really what will be a historic moment as 2012 da-14 brushes by us earthlings. that will start just about ten minutes from now. right now, i want to go straight to casey wian, live in pasadena, california, nasa's jet propulsion laboratory. and i imagine the excitement is palpable. they're tracking the asteroid. tell me where it is now. >> reporter: well, it is over australia, brooke. they are very excited here at jpl. it is a very, very big day. they have been tracking this asteroid for nearly a year. today is the day it is going to get closest it is going to come to the earth as you mentioned, 17,200 miles. and right now, it is coming from the southern hemisphere, approaching the earth, basically
them. so nasa is very good the at finding the much larger ones. but these smaller ones we as humans have not put a lot of effort into it. at the planetary society, we have people that are interested in it and we found this one. >> i want to bring in jason carroll, at the new york museum of natural history. tell us what you're learn building this huge astroid that will get very close to us today. >> well, let me give you some perspective. this meteorite is just about roughly the size of a car, i would say. da-14 which will be swinging by the earth later on this afternoon is about half the size of a football field. so much, much, much larger. and it will be traveling at a rate of about 17,450 miles per hour. that's something like 4.8 miles per second. so it's traveling at an incredible rate. weighs much larger than the meteorite you see behind me here. it will pass by at it closest point about 2:24 p.m. eastern standard time. if you're in indonesia, that is your best vantage point to see. it will be dark there at that particular time. but if you have a telescope, you should be able to
yesterday. nasa calls this a once in a century event. a meteor, pretty sizeable one, as a matter of fact, screamed out of the sky and slammed to earth. more than 1,000 people were hurt and thousands of buildings damaged. cnn's phil black is in russia. he hit the road today, trying to find the spot where the meteor landed. >> are we're walking on a frozen lake. it's about a 90-minute drive west. we're here because locals say a big fragment from the meteor punched through the ice. and is now sitting at the bottom of the lake. [ speaking in russian ] >> that was a very firm no. these police officers said it is prohibited for us to be here, to shoot video here, to try and walk any further. if if part of that meet orrite came down there, where those vehicles are, as locals say it did, the russian authorities don't want us or anyone else to see it. the meteor's final descent through the atmosphere was seen by people all across this region. at this school, students came outside to look at the trail of smoke it left in the sky. one student captured the moment on his phone. what were you thinking
the kind of objects that nasa cannot predict ahead of time. they're too small to actually track. the as asteroid that's passing the earth later this afternoon is an object that nasa can pick up ahead of time and can track. by the way, the two events are not related in any way. it's just a chance circumstance that both of these happened on the same day. >> okay. well, let's talk more about this asteroid. as we said, we know that's coming. so every ten years we can expect this sort of thing that happened over russia to happen somewhere in the world and there's not much we can do about it? >> no. there's no way really to predict objects that small coming into the earth atmosphere. tellus museum here is part of the network of nasa set up with fireball cameras. we have several in the southeast. and a few in the west. and this is part of a project, an effort, to track bright meteors. and we track about 8 to 12 bright meteors every night over cartersville. but when we link it with other cameras, we can tell how fast, how high, and even plot where in the solar system these smaller objec
combined to discover. it'll do that every month. >> watch more on former nasa astronaut ed lue and his urgent mission to save planet earth. this sunday on the next list. with so much competition, finding the right job is never easy. but with the nation's largest alumni network, including those in key hiring positions, university of phoenix can help connect you to a world of opportunity. [ male announcer ] when we built the cadillac ats from the ground up to be the world's best sport sedan... ♪ ...people noticed. ♪ the all-new cadillac ats -- 2013 north american car of the year. ♪ for a limited time, take advantage of this exceptional offer on the all-new cadillac ats. a hairline fracture to the mandible and contusions to the metacarpus. what do you see? um, i see a duck. be more specific. i see the aflac duck. i see the aflac duck out of work and not making any money. i see him moving in with his parents and selling bootleg dvds out of the back of a van. dude, that's your life. remember, aflac will give him cash to help cover his rent, car payments and keep everything as normal a
scientists can see cosmic rocks coming our way, doing something about it is the tricky part. in theory, nasa would be able to knock a threatening incoming asteroid off orbit so it misses earth. but there's very little precedent for that. the only thing that comes close was a 2005 mission where nasa steered a probe about the size of a coffee table into an oncoming docket, a project known as -- comet, a prooj knoject kn "deep comet." >> with the they're tess should work fine, certainly there would be details in launching a massive object into space, making sure we guide it correctly so it will hit the right spot on the asteroid to knock it appropriately off-course. >> reporter: scientists say these events, the meteor in russia and the asteroid's close call, should be a wake-up call. if the asteroid instead of missing earth had impacted, say, washington, d.c., it would have been devastating. >> if it's dense enough and could hit the earth intact, the impact crater itself would not be that big. but the effects from the shockwave and the heat from impact would be enough to basically wipe out ever
to nasa's jet propulsion laboratory, where they're keeping a close eye on what's going on. >> wolf, we're inside the deep space network operation center at the jet propulsion laboratory at nasa's facility in pasadena, california. it's at the jet propulsion lab, where nasa will be monitoring that asteroid. it's called 2012 da-14, because it was discovered last year. that's an artist rendering of it, but they're going to be looking at the real thing when it
close to earth? i'm here with paul, a research astronomer with nasa's near-earth object program. paul, let's get this out of the way. does this threaten earth? is it going to impact earth? >> no, we've been tracking this closely for a year and we know it will not hit the earth. >> what about the satellites? could it threaten the satellites out there? >> it is coming within the ring of tv satellites, but it's fairly far away from the majority, the beehive of satellites close to the earth, so we think that hitting a satellite is a very rare oprtunity. we don't think this will happen. >> all right, paul. good luck monitoring it and we'll be watching it closely. what paul and the others here tell us is you're not going to be able to see this with the naked eye. you'll need a telescope, at least in the northern hemisphere to see this and you'll have to wait until after sunset on friday because the asteroid will be moving away from earth at a very rapid rate of speet. they'll be using that tracking antenna to get a visual of the asteroid and measure its depth and its length. they only know
're a rocket scientist doesn't mean that you can't rock a hot haircut. we're going to introduce you to nasa's mohawk man. ue psoriasis. i decided enough is enough. ♪ [ spa lady ] i started enbrel. it's clinically proven to provide clearer skin. [ rv guy ] enbrel may not work for everyone -- and may not clear you completely, but for many, it gets skin clearer fast, within 2 months, and keeps it clearer through 6 months. [ male announcer ] enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events, including infections, tuberculosis, lymphoma, other cancers, nervous system and blood disorders, and allergic reactions have occurred. before starting enbrel, your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region where certain fungal infections are common. you should not start enbrel if you have an infection like the flu. tell your doctor if you're prone to infections, have cuts or sores, have had hepatitis b, have been treated for heart failure, or if you have symptoms such as persistent fever, bruising, bleeding, or paleness. if you've
-wide asteroid heading for earth. here's an image of the asteroid from nasa when it was more than 450,000 miles from earth. tom foreman has the details on how close it will get. >> let's get reference points. we talk about the earth many of us like to think the moon is close to us but the moon is not as close as you think. it's almost a quarter million miles away so what is close in space in satellites, we've been launching these for decades and filled the sky. some are fairly low, others quite high. the highest are communications and gps satellites, about 22,000 miles up in the air. where is this asteroid going to be? it is going to shoot out of the sky and cut right through the top of the satellite belt, at about 17,000 miles. >> an awful lot going on in the skies right now so we're joined by bill nye the science guy, is he in los angeles. bill, the meteor shower in russia, the ast noid some 17,000 miles away, i think everyone really has two questions here, first of all, is there a connection here and is there a difference between a meteor shower and an asteroid? help us out. >> oh, yeah, yea
are a total nerd and i think indra is, at 2:00, you can watch on the nasa website where they will track it too. and we'll track it. >> yes, we will. thank you, indra. >>> up next. a potential security flaw in the iphone 5 and its latest operating system. it exposed how password are, messages and contact list can all be hacked. bikes and balloon, wholesome noodles on spoons. a kite, a breeze, a dunk of grilled cheese. catches and throws, and spaghettio's. that's what happy kids are made of. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. try our entrees, snacks and new salads. wild salmon with basil, garlic chicken spring rolls, and now salads, like asian-style chicken. enjoy 100 delicious varieties under 400 calories. lean cuisine. enjoy 100 delicious varieties under 400 calories. for over 75 years people ...with geico... ohhh...sorry!. director's voice: here we go. from the top. and action for over 75 years people have saved money with gecko so.... director's voice: cut it! ...what...what did i say? gecko? i said gecko? aw... for over 75 year...(laughs. but still trying to keep it contained) direc
history have combined to discover. so it will do that every month. >> watch more on former nasa astronaut ed lew and his urgent mission to save planet earth. this sunday on "the next list." ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] what's the point of an epa estimated 42 miles per gallon if the miles aren't interesting? the lexus ct hybrid. this is the pursuit of perfection. good afternoon. chase sapphire. (push button tone) this is stacy from springfield. oh whoa. hello? yes. i didn't realize i'd be talking to an actual person. you don't need to press "0," i'm here. reach a person, not a prompt whenever you call chase sapphire. why should saturday night have all the fun? get two times the points on dining in restaurants, with chase sapphire preferred. >>> welcome back to "starting point." a quick look at some of the top stories this morning. a critical court date this afternoon for george zimmerman, the man accused of killing florida teen trayvon martin. a judge will decide whether to move ahead with a stand your ground hearing in april. if zimmerman's attorneys are successful there and prove he ha
, a distance that could be cleared in just about 15 minutes. don't get too worried. nasa says the odds of the asteroid hitting the earth are quite low. >>> a big announcement in the business world this morning, u.s. airways and american airlines merging. the new mega carrier will use the american name and be the largest airline in the world. alison kosik is tracking the story and of course all we care about is how this will flekt ticket prices. >> reporter: i hear you. that's what we're all thinking about. we're not going to necessarily see the ticket prices spike when you go to make your airline ticket tomorrow or the next day because mergers don't necessarily cause these spikes in airline fares. historically you look, fares don't go up because mergers happen. in fact, when you adjust these fares for inflation, they've actually been falling, even though it doesn't feel like it. fares have been falling since the 1980s. i want to you listen to travel expert mark murphy. here are some of the benefits of this merger. >> this merger will provide the traveler with better connections. i thin
her last words. her nasa good-bye. >> i take with me so many amazing memories and things that are in here, that are in here. i will treasurer forever. i'm going to miss you all so much. i love you very, very much. >> oh, dear. imagine you have family and her friends and you watch this, and it's going to be on air for the next nine weeks. some people argue here this reality show continuing to air this footage of reeva is in poor taste. others say it's just a fitting tribute. back to you. >> and her family supported it as well. thank you. appreciate it. the update on that tremendously complicated case. >>> a two-alarm fire at a recycling company in tampa, florida. they believe a pile of scrap metal caught on fire, but they don't know how. they plan to use foam to put out the flames and later they will use a bulldozer to try to move the scrap metal. >>> we have learned an aerospace executive has been fired after he allegedly slapped a crying toddler on a delta flight from minneapolis to atlanta. the company who employed 60-year-old joe hundley called his behavior offensive a
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17